7 Best Turbografx Cd Games That You Should Know Update 12/2022

Best Turbografx Cd Games

When the TurboGrafx-16 came out, it came with a CD-ROM drive called the TurboGrafx-16 CD. This was the first time that CD-ROM drives were used for video games. That success in Japan led to the Sega CD and pretty much every other CD-based console. It didn’t make much of an impact in the US. It’s safe to say that optical media was a big hit in the business. It was cheaper for CDs to make than cartridges, and because there was more storage space, game developers could put in cinematic cutscenes, voice acting, and Red Book audio in their games. Unlike other CD-based systems, TurboGrafx-CD games were more likely to be influenced by anime for the most part. By and large, the TurboGrafx-CD library was full of shoot ’em ups, adventure games, and RPGs that were very hard.

Lords of Thunder

Lords of Thunder

1993

Gate of Thunder is a side-scrolling shoot-em-up. Lords of Thunder, on the other hand, isn’t a real game. When there are so many shooters on a system like this, the game stands out because of a lot of interesting things that happen. Spaceships aren’t used in this game. Instead, players take on the role of a heavily-armored winged warrior. This warrior has a lot of different weapons at his disposal, and he can even use a sword for short-range fights sometimes. The game’s fantasy setting really helps it stand out from other shoot ’em ups from the time. Another thing that makes Lords of Thunder unique is its money system. In the game, players will earn gems that can be used to buy new items between levels. Gems can be used to buy new items. This means that players can boost their power metre, make their armour stronger, or stock up on bombs. Parallax scrolling, big bosses, and never-ending waves of enemies are all in Lords of Thunder. The best thing about the game is the heavy metal soundtrack, which has a lot of guitars and a lot of noise. When the TurboGrafx-CD came out, a lot of shoot ’em ups with impressive soundtracks were popular. You’ll find out more about this as you read this list.

Sylphia

1993

People who like Greek mythology will like this game. It is a vertical shooter that has a Greek mythology theme. Instead of a ship, players take control of a beautiful winged goddess named Sylphia, who is a lot of fun. Sylphia can get different weapons based on the four classical elements (fire, water, earth, and air). She also has a lot of sub-weapons, like homing projectiles and rotating rock shields, that she can use. In the game, the ancient Greek setting is a lot of fun, and the enemies make it stand out from other games in the same genre. As Sylphia goes on her mission to protect her home, she’ll come across bare-breasted harpies, trident-bearing dragons, and a lot of huge gladiator-themed bosses. People say that Compile were great at what they did and made some of the best shoot ’em ups ever. When compared to some of Compile’s best games, Sylphia is short and easy. But while it lasts, it’s fun to play. There’s a $100 price tag, but every fan of the genre should get to see it.

Snatcher

Snatcher

1992

Takes a lot of ideas from American movies like Terminator and Blade Runner. Snatcher is an adventure game that takes place in the future. This is a story about a detective in the future who is trying to find robots called “snatchers” who kill people and take their places. They have a bad habit of killing people and taking their places. Gross! People who like action won’t be able to get into adventure games, and the simple menu-driven interface won’t be for everyone, so it’s not for everyone. This game has one of the best stories ever in a video game, no matter how you feel about it. The characters are interesting, the setting is detailed, and the story moves at a pace that keeps you on your toes the whole time. When Hideo Kojima made Snatcher, he made it as one of the most interesting games he has ever made. A lot of suspense but not too many words. Snatcher was first released for the MSX2 and PC-88 in 1988. The PC Engine CD version had better graphics and sounds. More importantly, it also made the script longer so that there was a third act that wrapped up the story.

Sapphire

1995

Sapphire is a vertically-scrolling shooter made by Hudson. It is one of the most impressive games made for the PC Engine. Later, when the Saturn and PlayStation were already out, the game came out. It used parallax scrolling effects and pre-rendered sprites to be able to compete with the next generation of video games. Players can choose from four different ships in the game, but the gameplay is pretty simple for the most part. Every other part of the game, on the other hand, is full of ideas. During the game, each stage looks very different from the next one. One minute, you’ll be fighting robots above a futuristic city; the next, you’ll be fighting huge dragons in a different setting from that one. A lot of shooting games have a lot of enemies that don’t think about what they’re doing. Sapphire has a lot of enemies that don’t think about what they’re doing. Sapphire has a lot of bosses in each level, so there are a lot of them. In this game, you see tanks that roll across the screen, flying polygonal robot skulls, and kabuki warriors who turn into demons. You’d think that Sapphire, which has cute policewomen, a guitar-driven soundtrack, and a lot of great boss fights, would be a classic. Unfortunately, most gamers don’t know about Sapphire because it was never released outside of Japan and didn’t get a lot of attention. Today, the game is so rare that a copy can cost you $400 or more.

Puyo Puyo CD 2

Puyo Puyo CD 2

1996

The Puyo Puyo games have a simple goal: arrange falling blobs in a way that groups colours together. The game isn’t all that different from other “falling blocks” puzzle games from the time, but it got a lot of attention because it let players make combos. When a player does well, the game doesn’t just reward them. It also punishes their opponents. The “garbage blobs” that fall into your opponent’s playing area when you clear out a lot of blobs with one move will be thrown away. Because of this, people are encouraged to think quickly so that they can set up their own combos before their opponent can mess them up. Games in the series let players fight against a variety of interesting computer-controlled opponents. The two-player mode is where the series really shines. Puyo Puyo was a surprise hit when it came out in 1991. A few years later, the game went to new heights thanks to a few experimental gameplay changes that led to longer games. Puyo Puyo CD 2 was a direct port of the arcade game. It had full voice. Voice: If you don’t understand Japanese, this voice won’t be very important. I would have preferred if the CD format had been used for a better soundtrack. If you don’t care about how well it uses CDs, Puyo Puyo CD 2 is still a great puzzle game.

Pop N’ Magic

This is a 2-player platform game in the style of Bubble Bobble, where you have to clear each screen of enemies before moving on. When you play Pop N’ Magic, you turn the bad guys into coloured orbs and throw the orbs into each other to clear the screens.

Fausette Amour

Fausette Amour

Bionic Commando is a platform game that looks a lot like this one. When you meet Fausette Amour, she gives you a melee strike, magic, and a grappling hook. When you swing up, you get a small amount of invincibility that lets you bounce on enemies. The level design here is good, and the grappling hook is an interesting weapon to learn how to use (a la Sonic the Hedgehog). It can be a little slow at times, but the high level of presentation, good graphics, and grappling gameplay make it worth giving it a try.